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Have you written a Manifesto lately?

What is it lately - everyone wants to get into the Manifesto authorship racket.  When I was growing up - only commies and the unibomber wrote manifestos.

Well after taking a stroll through the internet, there are quite a few nice manifestos out there.  Here are a few that I subscribe to...

The Agile Manifesto - four comparative value statements and 12 principles for how to build better software.  With an industry failure rate of 72% boy do we need a manifesto!

The ScrumMaster Manifesto - because this is a group of people that are downtrodden every day.  Sitting in a seat for 2 days straight without nodding off is no bais for a system of government - to paraphrase Dennis - come see the violence inherent in the system.


The Manifesto for Software Craftsmanship - because we need the bar raised.

The Mother [bleep] ing Manifesto for Programming Mother [bleep] ers - because sometime a four letter word says more than a well crafted phrase.

The MoreAgile Manifesto... because incremental improvement beats the alternative.

The Holstee Manifesto - because it is my life - and I will do what I love.


The Gangplank Manifesto, creating community changing culture, walk the plank.

The Cult of Done Manifesto - enough said.

Having a motivation problem?  The BootStart Manifesto might help you - but you must fall in love with your problem (not the solutions).

The After the Agile Manifesto, Stop Writing Any More. Please. A really long list of manifesto, and a plea to stop it already.  Oh!  Maybe I should end it here.

And now the PMO has a Manifesto (don't you just hear the resonance).

What would happen if a Manifesto were written as a scientific experiment - starting with a null hypothesis? Bob Marshall's Agile H0.


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Well I haven't updated this Manifesto page in a number of months... haven't found anything worth the trouble until today (Feb 1, 2017) a day that may change my carrer journey... Agile Transition Guide may get a rev. version number soon. Thanks to the Manifesto for Agile Company Development by Agile 102: (reprinted below). Credit for this wonderful work goes to: Matt the Agile Coach on twitter @MattAgileCoach.

Manifesto for Agile Company Development

We are discovering new ways of transforming corporate processes, activities and structures by helping companies take better advantage of Agile software development techniques. Throughout this journey we have recognised it is better to:
  • Create streams of business value rather than end-to-end projects.
  • Structure organisations for pace rather than for complexity.
  • Model and experiment rather than describe and document.
  • Create processes to empower people rather than to constrain them.
  • Promote cross-functional collaboration rather than singular accountability.
  • Discover and prioritise customer needs rather than deliver internal vision.
We recognise that all of these may not be entirely achievable within the constraints of some industries; however promoting the positive values from within each one will enable more agility in any organisation.


I just saw this today and it instantly resonates with me as that thing that many people have desired - What comes next after Agile? I've decide that a journey is the prize, not some destination. However this manifesto might set the goal for many of us that are not working on our "own" companies... but trying to help with another's company.

Now had I been invited to the chalet to collaborate on the manifesto - I'd like to polish the word "company" into a broader term "organization". To include groups that are not-for-profit and weirdos that might find they fit within the realm of "The People's Scrum" by Tobias Mayer.

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Nov, 2017 a colleague sent me this manifesto:
I, David Jayakaran, am uncovering ways to cut through the crap of religiosity and get to the purpose for all of creation including human existence. Through this journey I have come to value: 
          Relationship with Jesus over reason or logic
          Heart transformation over behavior modification
          Truth/reality over facts
          Life experience over ideology, philosophy or belief system 
That is, while there may be value in the items on the right, I value the items on the left much more.
Having interacted with David for a few months - he's expressively living his manifesto. RESPECT.


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