Wednesday, July 29, 2015

On my ToDo book shelf




A wish list of books I'd like to read...

Large-Scale Scrum - more with LeSS  by Craig Larman & Bas Vodde
It describes how we did scrum 10 years ago without the need to think about scaling on a VoIP project at SpeakEasy.  Four teams of around 40 developers (programmers, testers, UI, UX, BA, system engineers, etc.), one backlog, one awesome Product Owner (with a team of help), one deliver of working tested software, on time and on budget.

My current goto resource for how to do Scrum at any scale.





Team Genius: The New Science of High-Performing Organizations
by Rich Karlgaard, Michael S. Malone

"Throughout, Rich Karlgaard and Michael S. Malone share insights and real-life examples gleaned from their careers as journalists, analysts, investors, and globetrotting entrepreneurs, meeting successful teams and team leaders to reveal some "new truths":

The right team size is usually one fewer person than what managers think they need.
The greatest question facing good teams is not how to succeed, but how to die.
Good "chemistry" often makes for the least effective teams.
Cognitive diversity yields the highest performance gains—but only if you understand what it is.
How to find the "bliss point" in team intimacy—and become three times more productive.
How to identify destructive team members before they do harm.
Why small teams are 40 percent more likely to create a successful breakthrough than a solo genius is.
Why groups of 7 (± 2), 150, and 1,500 are magic sizes for teams.


Eye-opening, grounded, and essential, Team Genius is the next big idea to revolutionize business."


Passionate Performance  by Lee J. Colan

This quick read cuts through the clutter to offer practical strategies to engage the minds and heart of your employeees. Learn why this is such a powerful advantage for your organization. Read it and conquer your competition!






Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World   by General Stanley McChrystal


A NEW APPROACH FOR A NEW WORLD McChrystal and his colleagues discarded a century of conventional wisdom and remade the Task Force, in the midst of a grueling war, into something new: a network that combined extremely transparent communication with decentralized decision-making authority. The walls between silos were torn down. Leaders looked at the best practices of the smallest units and found ways to ex­tend them to thousands of people on three continents, using technology to establish a oneness that would have been impossible even a decade earlier. The Task Force became a “team of teams”—faster, flatter, more flex­ible—and beat back Al Qaeda.
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