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I want it all, but don't change my connectors

People just don't like change.  Case in point, all the hubbub over the new iPhone 5 lightening adapter plug.  So many people are upset that the connector is changing from the 9 year old iPod 30 pin adaptor to the new lightning adaptor.  Yet at the same time the iPhone 5 pre-orders have record sells (2 million in first 24 hrs).

Why did Apple force this change on it's loyal customer base?  Dont they know we humans don't adapt well to changes.  Oh yes, we want the new shinny iPhone but we want it to stay the same AND get better.

Maybe this picture will give you a clue as to why Apple changed the connector. It shows a typical iPhone and it's 30 pin connector, with a Raspberry Pi.  The Raspberry Pi is a full fledged computer on a board.  Take a look at the board and the most obvious thing is all the connectors.  The interface connections are the largest things.  They occupy the most space.

Raspberry Pi & iPhone compared
The reason for the change?  So that Apple could pack more techy goodness into the same volume, and have a platform for future techno stuff.  They miniaturized almost every internal component of the iPhone (the complete redesign).  Hey - that is innovation.  And I have to believe there will be room for new components (like the Near Field Communication radio) when that eco-system is ready for consumer devices.

Comments

Dan Ebert said…
I don't mind that they changed the plug ... just that Apple is charging $30 and $40 for adapters to work with existing chargers. We will need 6 adapters unless we want to schlep one around everywhere we take the phone. :(
David Koontz said…
So would you be happier if Apple with their $6 B. in market cap & tons of cash in the bank would have included just ONE adapter in the iPhone 5 box? Is that $35 adapter keeping you from purchasing?
Neon Tapir said…
I'd be happier if they acknowledged my loyalty in some way. For example, offer existing customers a coupon towards the purchase.

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