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Showing posts from April, 2012

Video of The Marshmallow Challenge at Agile Games 2012

Agile Games 2012 conference in Cambridge.

"The Marshmallow Challenge is a remarkably fun and instructive design exercise that encourages teams to experience simple but profound lessons in collaboration, innovation and creativity."


David presenting the challenge at Agile Games conference.


Watch Tom Wujec's TED.com talk about his many experiences with this exercise.

Agile Games 2013!



See Also:  Results Oriented Web conference Marshmallow Challenge workshop

Don't mistake the Marshmallow Challenge with the Marshmallow Test by Walter Mischel.  One is a design challenge - the other is an experiment designed to see if personality traits such as self-control are malleable.

Product Owner Scrum Immersion Workshop

Pictures from a recent Product Owner Scrum Immersion workshop.

Here are some Panoramas of the simulated sprints (also see photosynths).












Compare Titanic to Costa Concordia

Compare Titanic to Costa Concordia :: 100 yrs apart - what have we learned?



Titanic has 19th century tech but barely able to use it to the fullest ( wireless radio - morse code - very small message payload - poor distress procedures & discipline in industry).  Used 18th c. tech - flares to signal distress - but ignored by closest vessel.  Left the ship watches binoculares in port (I've done that).  Capt'n made errors in judgement - full steam ahead through known ice flow with no binos on watch... stupid move.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-extraordinary-story-of-the-titanic

http://www.bbc.co.uk/search/news/costa_concordia

The Costa Concorda's captain made several big blunders in judgement.  He may wish he had gone down with his ship, as Capt'n Smith of the Titanic did.


While both captains made blunders of judgement, the state of the art of sea distaster has changed in 100 years.  The two disasters are not very comparable on the environmental fac…

Scrum Masters valued higher than Project Managers by some

So I hear someone say:

My company is not thinking of hiring Scrum Masters for the current Scrum adoption initiative that is underway. We appear to have plenty of Project Managers (yet that community believes they need more "heads"). Yes, "heads" is the unit of measure for our "resources."  So the apparent logic that I have explained to me - because I'm just too illogical to arrive at the obvious is ... we will just let the PMs do the SM roll. Right, no problem there. It shouldn't take too much time to do the Scrum Master's job... just a few meetings and that silly 15 minute stand-up each day.
Yep - that's the plan.

So now lets look at one metric and ask ourselves why this trend is happening.  Let's compare salaries of Scrum Masters to Project Managers.  You can get the  latest info via Indeed.com.


David Bland (Scrumology) did this some time back and reported that a SM in 2009 averaged $88K/yr, when a PM was earning more. Then again in 2…

Recreate to Improve

How frequently do you revise the training that you give people?  I try to change something each time I present.  Purposefully mutate the presentation, then reflect on the outcome.  These are not scientific experiments, more intuition based  learning - which I believe is very worth while.  So one technique that helps me to change the presentation is to not use computer generated slides (Power Point).

With slide decks - one may change an individual slide an assess if it was better or worse; however when one creates unique artifact each time it will naturally mutate.  Some times for the better, sometimes for simplicity, and at times for the worst.  Yet with a flip chart artifact, if it is unclear, you can just pull out a marker and fix it in real-time.  And you may learn what will improve the artifact the next time you use it.
Some people don't like the high amount of time required to create posters for a course each time.  Yet it is a great time to think about the class.  I believe …

A Leadership Paradox

Are the capabilities of a CEO leader similar to the leadership needs of a ScrumMaster or Agile team leader?  I think they are very similar.  And if so then the risk factors that are associated with CEO succession planning would also effect the Scrum team's succession planning (assuming anyone is concerned about the leadership changes to a Scrum team).

So let's look for the fractal nature of self similar systems within the Agile company.


Here are the top risk factors for CEO succession planning.
"Of the top 11 factors HR executives cited as the most common causes for CEO succession failure, eight pertained to deficiencies in interpersonal skills -- failure to build relationships and a team environment, a mismatch for the corporate culture, inability to win company support, being egotistical, not flexible, poor management skills, poor communication and lack of political savvy."  (p. 51, Chief Learning Officer, Apr. 2012 www.CLOmedia.com) Source: Chally Group Worldwide …