Skip to main content

Camera lens are getting cheeper

I have always wanted a Canon Pro Lens, one of those white and black lens that sets the serious photographer apart from the amateur.  A few years ago I rented one for an Alaska cruise we did.  Hoping to get images of big horn sheep or bear - something one typically needs a long lens to capture.

In actual practice the people with the regular lens got as good of images as I did with the super fast long lens.  Why - because they could find the target faster with the wider angle.  When I started thinking about this, it made me question the need for a 35 mm camera.  Would a typical point and shoot give me just as good vacation photos for the scrap book or slide show?

I tested this primise out on a European vacation.  I carried the pocket sized point and shoot Canon Power Shot SD1100 IS (8 Mpix with image stabilization).  While my wife carried a Canon 20D (35mm with various lens).  We shot many of the same scenes and typical tourist images, and while it is possible to see differences in the images upon inspection.  All the finner details are lost when the image ends up in a iMovie slide show and the Ken Burns effect pans across the image in 4 seconds, then transitions to the next slide.  However the different camera solutions are telling in the candid photos sitting around the table in a cafe, or standing around a town square of the images of "Man on a Horse" or "Pigeon on a Statue".  The small form factor of the pocket camera makes for easier capturing of these images and situations.  This is a large advantage for this solution.

Imagine the advantage of an ubiquitous camera solution by putting the camera in a cell phone (the iPhone rocks this solution) and the days of the amateur with a 35mm and a pro lens are all but gone.  There is no need for that pro lens unless you get paid for images.  I don't get paid for images.  So in fulfilling my childish needs - I bought a Canon Pro Lens coffee mug.

iPhone image of a fleeting moment at sunset, no time to run get the big camera.


Now I can look like the serious photographer, drink my coffee and pull out my iPhone for that candid shot without any scene prep time required.  I'll be able to get rid of this expensive setup.


So where is the value in the camera lens solutions?  Having a set of interchangeable lens is a great solution to one problem.  When you want a photograph it might be the wrong solution, the great solution that is in search of the problem.  Will this solution allow for a disruption solution to sneak into the industry or eco-system.  Perhaps a camera made into you cell phone.  Is a camera in the hand worth a wide angle lens and a telephoto lens in the bag?  If you manage a product or product portfolio you may want to think along these lines from time to time...  What is the alternative product to your baby?


Post a Comment

Most Popular on Agile Complexification Inverter

Exercise:: Definition of Ready & Done

Assuming you are on a Scrum/Agile software development team, then one of the first 'working agreements' you have created with your team is a 'Definition of Done' - right?



Oh - you don't have a definition of what aspects a user story that is done will exhibit. Well then, you need to create a list of attributes of a done story. One way to do this would be to Google 'definition of done' ... here let me do that for you: http://tinyurl.com/3br9o6n. Then you could just use someone else's definition - there DONE!

But that would be cheating -- right? It is not the artifact - the list of done criteria, that is important for your team - it is the act of doing it for themselves, it is that shared understanding of having a debate over some of the gray areas that create a true working agreement. If some of the team believes that a story being done means that there can be no bugs found in the code - but some believe that there can be some minor issues - well, …

Elements of an Effective Scrum Task Board

What are the individual elements that make a Scrum task board effective for the team and the leadership of the team?  There are a few basic elements that are quite obvious when you have seen a few good Scrum boards... but there are some other elements that appear to elude even the most servant of leaders of Scrum teams.









In general I'm referring to a physical Scrum board.  Although software applications will replicated may of the elements of a good Scrum board there will be affordances that are not easily replicated.  And software applications offer features not easily implemented in the physical domain also.





Scrum Info Radiator Checklist (PDF) Basic Elements
Board Framework - columns and rows laid out in bold colors (blue tape works well)
Attributes:  space for the total number of stickies that will need to belong in each cell of the matrix;  lines that are not easy eroded, but are also easy to replace;  see Orientation.

Columns (or Rows) - labeled
    Stories
    To Do
    Work In P…

Webinar: Collaboration at Scale: Defining Done, Ready, and NO.

I was invited to participate in a Scrum Alliance Webinar.  Maybe you would like to listen to us in a discussion of techniques to collaborate at scale (remotely and with many people).  The topic is one that I've got some experience in discussions - yet I never seem to get to done...
Collaboration at Scale: Defining Done and Ready and NO for Distributed Teams
With Joel Bancroft-Connors, Agile Organizational Coach; David A. Koontz, Agile Transition Guide; and Luke Hohmann, CEO and Founder of Conteneo, Inc.


14 February 2018 11 a.m. ET (USA).




The Scrum Guide is pretty clear on the criticality of the definition of Done: "When a Product Backlog item or an Increment is described as "Done," everyone must understand what "Done" means. However, the Scrum Guide ALSO says that the definition of Done can "vary significantly per Scrum Team." This leads us to examine when and how the definition of Done should vary, how distributed teams should cr…

A T-Shaped 21st Century Knowledge Worker

Knowledge workers in the 21st Century must have many areas of deep knowledge, while also be capable of collaboration across multiple other domains with dissimilar T-shaped individuals.  This description of a person is a metaphor.  Compare it to the shape of the "I" in the classic saying there is no "I" in Team.


I first read about Scott Ambler's term "Generalizing Specialist" - but it's so hard to remember the proper order of the words... get it backwards and it has an inverted meaning... T-Shaped is easier to remember. 
A generalizing specialist is someone who:
Has one or more technical specialties (e.g. Java programming, Project Management, Database Administration, ...). Has at least a general knowledge of software development. Has at least a general knowledge of the business domain in which they work. Actively seeks to gain new skills in both their existing specialties as well as in other areas, including both technical and domain areas.  General…

A FAILURE to Communicate

I was working with a failing team some time ago.  I use "failing" to describe the outcome of the team - not the people on the team.  Are you OK with that description?



An issue arrose in the stand up - a team member that was to verify the quality of a procedure did so and reported that there were a few records that didn't match expectation in the data set.  Upon inquire the number of records not matching was over 2000.  Most people acknowledged immediately the exaggeration - I could tell by the laughter.  After about 10 minutes of discussing the details of the problem - it appeared the team had a handle on the specific situation.

I stopped the discussion and inquired if they could name the impediment.  One team member did a great job of describing the impediment as a _communication gap_.  Wonderful - I could work with that - the problem had a name and it didn't include anyones Proper Name.

"If the problem has a first name; we are going to have a problem."

I&#…