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Agile Software Development Timeline

A Timeline by definition is an iterative document - it is incrementally built minute by minute with no known completion point. However the historical entries on the time line might be elaborate also. This is a rough draft... please comment with new (better - more important, more accurate) events. Or point me to better resources - other historical time lines etc.  Thanks!

Watch Earth's history on a 100yd football field timeline.



Agile Software Development Timeline


1202 Fibonacci introduces Arabic numerals (0-9 and place value) to the West via book “Liber Abaci” (Book of Abacus or Calculation).  The Zero is born!

1950s Demining teaches in Japan

1960s NASA’s Project mercury uses test-first development and micro-increments

1971 The Psychology of Computer Publishing by Gerald Weinberg - largely ignored

1976 EVO Methodology by Tom Gilb

1980s Japanese car companies expand into Europe & Americas

1986 New New Product Development by Takeuchi & Nonaka

1986 No Silver Bullet by Fred Brooks - advantages of Incremental & Iterative Development

1987 Peopleware by deMarco & Lister

1988 Iterative delivery described by Tom Gilb in Principles of Software Engineering Management

Software Patterns

Pair Programming - organizational patterns described by James Coplien

1990 The Machine that Changed the World by Womack & Jones

1990s Object-oriented Programming

1990s Schwaber uses early Scrum at Advanced Development Methods
1990s Sutherland uses early Scrum at Easel Corporation
1990s Internet
1990s Dot-Com Boom

1994 Book:  Agile Competitors and Virtual Organization: Strategies for Enriching the Customer

1995 DSDM consortium publishes version 1.

1995 Scrum Methodology paper by Sutherland & Schwaber

1996 Lean Thinking  by Womack & Jones

1996 Journey of the Software Professional: The Sociology of Software Development
By Hohmann

1996 Beck creates XP at Chrysler Comprehensive Compensation System (C3)

1997 Feature-Driven Development (FDD) by Jeff De Luca

1998 Extreme Programming by Kent Beck on c2.com wiki

1998 Crystal family of methodologies by Alistair Cockburn

1999 Java Modeling in Color with UML by Peter Coad  - Ch 6 describes FDD.

1999, Extreme Programming Explained by Beck

1990s Crystal Clear by Alistair Cockburn

1999 The Pragmatic Programmer: From Journeyman to Master by Hunt & Thomas

2000 Adaptive Software Development: A Collaborative Approach to Managing Complex Systems by Highsmith

2001 Agile Manifesto Signed - Feb in Snowbird Utah http://agilemanifesto.org/history.html

2001 Agile-Testing Yahoo! Group started

2001 Agile Software Development with Scrum by Schwaber & Beedle

2003 Lean Software Development by Poppendieck

2004  Watir released

2004 Agile Project management with Scrum by Schwaber

2005 Fit for Developing Software  by Mugridge & Cunningham

2006 BDD article by Dan North in Better Software Magazine

2006 RSpec released

2006 Selenium released

2007 Kanban introduced

2007 Scaled Agile Framework by Dean Leffingwell

2008 Cucumber released

2008 Robot Framework open sourced

2008 Slim update to Fitnesse

2009 The RSpec Book by Chelimsky & Astels

2009 Software Craftsmanship Conference

2009 DevOps :: Dev and Ops Cooperation at Flickr 10+ Deploys Per Day! (Talk at Velocity 2009)

2011 PMI introduces Agile Certified Practitioner

2011 Mob Programming begins at Hunter - Woody Zuill

2014 Schism in community of Scrum over techniques of scaling to enterprise

2016 Manifesto for Agile Company Development by Matt the Agile Coach



See Also:
The timeline in the Evolution of Scrum - 3Back



Timeline of Long Distance Communication


A Perspective on Time by  Visual.ly
51 Most Popular Tech Gadgets through the Years - Popular Mechanics




Cartographies of Time: A Visual History of the Timeline
A chronology of one of our most inescapable metaphors, or what Macbeth has to do with Galileo.


4 Billion years of Technology
infographic



Sources:

Elisabeth Hendrickson, Quality Tree Software, Inc.
Agile, Testing, and Quality: Looking Back, Moving Forward.  Oct 28, 2009
History of Agile S/W Development
Timeline of Computer Science  150 major events (via MIT) from 300BC to now

Here's the Timeline of the Universe... it may be a bit long...

Comments

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Boxer (26-31 in, 55-110 lbs).




Bulldog (40-55 lbs).





Labrador Retriever (21-25 in, 55-130 lbs).





Great Dane (28-38 in, 120-200 lbs).




Komondor (25-32 in, 90-130 lbs).


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